My SRS Portfolio March 2022

My SRS Portfolio and Thoughts [March 2022]

My SRS Portfolio March 2021
My SRS Portfolio March 2022

What an epic start to 2022. In just one quarter we are now in the amidst of the Perfect Long Storm, Russian-Ukraine Tension and Will Smith slapping Chris Rock. Maybe the saving grace is that we will be able to travel to Malaysia (with more freedom) from 1st April.

In any case, this is the SRS update for March 2022. If you are new to SRS, I would encourage you to start from my most read SRS article, 5 Things You Need To Know About SRS to begin.

Disclaimer: This is not and should not be taken as a buy/sell recommendation.

My Thoughts And Consideration

My SRS Portfolio and Thoughts [March 2022]
My SRS Portfolio and Thoughts [March 2022]
The most glaring underperformance continues to be my exposure into Chinese Technology Stocks (SGX:HST). The price is already 41% down since the last time I entered. The question I get asked frequently is how will China do moving ahead.

According to Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee meeting on Dec 2021, the focus on 2022 will be prioritize stability while pursuing progress. This is a great difference from their focus of strengthening antimonopoly rules in 2021. I believe this might be a turning point and am considering a Dollar Cost Averaging into SGX:HST. This is after a capital injection into the SRS for tax purpose.

Final Thoughts

I reemphasize again that this is not and should not be taken as a buy/sell recommendation. Wishing you all the best!

 

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.

There were only two things certain in life Death and Taxes

Individual Income Tax Season 2022

It is the time of the year again. Last year, I wrote about whether an individual is required to pay taxes and my opinion of effective income tax in Singapore. This year, I will simply comment on the latest happenings and what you should take note of.

Disclaimer: Please refer to IRAS Website whenever in doubt.

There were only two things certain in life Death and Taxes
There were only two things certain in life Death and Taxes

Year Of Assessment 2022

The filing for YOA2022 have started on 1st March 2022. We will have until 18 April 2022 (*very important date*) to e-File our income taxes.

How To Reduce My Income Taxes Effective Income Tax Rates
How To Reduce My Income Taxes Effective Income Tax Rates (From YA 2017 to YA 2023)

Income tax rates will remain the same until YA2023. Thereafter, there will be changes for people earning > $320,000 as highlighted in the Budget 2022.

This year, it is stated that 7 out of 10 taxpayers in Singapore will not be required to file a tax return as there have been initiatives to simplify tax filings. This includes No-Filing Services (NFS) and Auto-inclusion Schemes. Partnerships whose revenue of up to $200K will only need a 2 line statement as compared to 4 line previously.

It is worth noting that you can make changes to your income or reliefs by making an amendment on the IRAS portal 30 days from date of tax bill. Any excess taxes can be refunded by PayNow.

Final Thoughts

Think about your Netflix subscription and you are buying their library of movies. I consider individual income tax as a subscription that I pay to stay in my country. I’m paying for my safety, the public goods and mainly the comfort to live in Singapore even if the perfect storm is coming.

I like the progressive income taxes system in Singapore but I’m like most of you, it is not fun paying taxes.

I wish you the best in your financial journey. Hope to hear from some of you. I will be arranging for a CPF webinar in the weeks ahead. Please leave a comment below if you wish to be updated on the details of the webinar.

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.

3 Key Changes To CPF Policies From 2022

3 Key Changes To CPF Policies From 2022

January is the month where many people are interested in the CPF. I believe this is because we usually set our life / financial / career goals for 2022 at the start of the year. For those of you who have financial goals, I welcome you to Wealthdojo and hope that this website will be a good resource for you.

3 Key Changes To CPF Policies From 2022
3 Key Changes To CPF Policies From 2022

This article will only highlight 3 2022 CPF Policies updates. If you wish to look at all the other changes that was announced in Nov 2021, you can take a look here.

#1: Basic Retirement Sum (BRS) / Full Retirement Sum (FRS) / Enhanced Retirement Sum (ERS) Updates

The CPF retirement sum is a moving target because of inflation. This is to ensure that CPF payouts will be sufficient during our retirement years. For 2022, the amount in BRS, FRS and ERS are $96,000, $192,000 and $288,000 respectively. If you are turning 55 this year, these numbers will be relevant to you.

#2: Basic Healthcare Sum (BHS) Updates

In 2022, the BHS will be $66,000. This is the estimated savings needed for basic healthcare for old age and is adjusted yearly until the age of 65. This will be fixed for the rest of your lives. If you are turning 65 this year, this number will be relevant to you.

#3: Increase in CPF Top Up Tax Reliefs Updates

You may enjoy tax relief of up to $8,000 if you may a top up for yourself and an additional $8,000 if you make a top up for your loved ones. However, the $8,000 tax relief cap is now shared between Special Account (SA), Retirement Account (RA) and the MediSave Account (MA).

This update has posted the most concerns and I believe this will affect a specific group of individuals which I will explain later.

To understand this, we have to take a step back and look at how top ups were done before 2022 especially MA Top-ups.

Before 2022, topping up MA is a popular tax relief option together with Retirement Sum Top-Up (RSTU). It depends on 2 factors.

  • The difference between the CPF Annual Limit ($37,740) and the CPF contributions made for the calendar year
  • The difference between the BHS and current MA balance

I will be illustrating using an example of Mr Goh (age 25) with a salary of $10,000 monthly with no bonus. As he is young, we can safely assume that his MA amount is way below the BHS. As the the Ordinary Wage ceiling is capped at $6,000 currently, his annual CPF contribution will be the following.

A: Annual CPF Limit: $37,740

B: Annual CPF Contribution: $6000*12*0.37= $26,640.

C: Eligible VC-MA Top-up amount: A – B = $11,100

D: Max RSTU Top-up limit before 2022 = $7,000

E: Total Eligible Tax Relief: C + D = $18,100

As you can see, it is slightly more complicated to calculate tax-reliefs previously.

After 2022, it is very simple. $8,000 tax relief cap is now shared between Special Account (SA), Retirement Account (RA) and the MediSave Account (MA). This means for Mr Goh, his eligible tax relief decreased by $10,100 ($18,100 – $8,000).

Now that we understand the theory behind it, let’s put things into context.

Personally, I think this will not affect most of us. This is because the median income for Singaporeans is $4,534 in 2020 including CPF contributions from employers. It is an income where tax is rather manageable (in my opinion) and you might not consider to contribute to CPF for tax purposes. I do understand that some of you might be attracted to the interest rates from CPF, feel free to contribute at your discretion.

The group that I believe will be affected are the high income young individuals. At that income level, you might be looking for ways to have tax-reliefs such as SRS Top-ups to reduce your taxes.

Final Thoughts

The journey of your financial freedom begins with the first step. Congratulations for reaching the end of the article. I hope to see and hear (write down your thoughts in the comments below) from some of you in 2022.

Take care.

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore

It is the Supplementary Retirement Scheme (SRS) contribution season. If you are 40 and above, do check out my previous post on the 5 things you need to know about SRS. Interestingly, someone emailed me on my 6 Level Wealth Karate System Page to ask about what will happen to their SRS account if they leave Singapore.

In this article, we will talk about 3 potential scenarios (i) if you are a foreigner and continue to stay in Singapore (you should!) (ii) if you are a foreigner but decide to leave Singapore (iii) if you are local and intend to retire in overseas (Thailand, Phuket, you name it).

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore
3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore: Don’t leave =(

I’m a Singaporean and proud to be one. Singapore is a wonderful country. You should not leave =). Unfortunately, I do meet people who love Singapore but have no choice but to leave because they were asked to relocate to another country. Anyway, let’s set the context for the SRS. Most people will probably be concerned if it is worth it to contribute to their SRS when long term stay in Singapore is not confirm. We will touching on that.

I would also need to point out the withdrawal tax concession and the 5% early withdrawal penalty.

 

SRS Early Withdrawal Penalty (Local and Foreigner)

Withdrawal after retirement age (current age 62): You can start making penalty-free withdrawal from your SRS account. You will only be taxed 50% of the amount you withdraw for the calendar year.

Withdrawal before retirement age (current age 62): Although you can make withdrawal from your SRS account at any time that you want, you will be subjected to a penalty of 5% of the amount withdrawn. In addition, the full amount withdrawn will also be subject to income tax.

There are other special circumstances which we will not be going into detail (Death/Medical Grounds/Bankrupt)

 

SRS Additional Withdrawal Criteria (Foreigner)

As a foreigner, you can withdraw your SRS monies without the 5% penalty if you meet the following criteria:

(i) a foreigner for a continuous period of at least 10 years preceding the date of withdrawal.
(ii) one lump sum after maintaining your SRS account for at least 10 years from the date of your first contribution.

For such withdrawal, you will be taxed 50% of the withdrawal amount.

After understanding the above criteria, let’s consider a the few scenario that might happen to you.

 

Case #1: Foreigner and continue to stay in Singapore

James is a foreigner who is staying in Singapore for many years. When I first met James, he told me that he really love Singapore. He likes the sunny weather, he likes the hawker food (his favourite is chicken rice) and also a father of 2 beautiful young children.

He has an intention to stay in Singapore to raise his family.

James contributes to his SRS account every year. This is because as a foreigner, he does not have CPF contribution. By contributing to the SRS, he is able to reduce his taxable income, save on taxes and also save for retirement.

James is 45 this year and he is plan to contribute the full $35,700 into his SRS every year. He makes around $160,000 a year. Assuming no other personal tax deduction.

Without SRS: James pays $13,950 of taxes that year.

With SRS: James pays $8,595 of taxes that year. (His chargeable income is $160,000 – $35,700)

In total, he saves $5,355 worth of taxes that year. He also saves $35,7000 in his SRS which he can use to invest for his retirement.

In 10 years time, he save a total of $53,550 worth of taxes. At the same time, he would have accumulated nearly $481,462 if he decides to invest his monies in his SRS assuming it grows at 4%. He can decide if he wants to withdraw the lump sum.

If he does so, he have to pay 50% taxes on withdrawal amount. Let’s assume he does not have any income that year. He will be taxed on $241,000 (50% of $481,462). He pays a tax of $28,945. He saves about $24,605 ($53,550-$28,945) if he contributes to SRS. In this case, he benefits from this.

However, James may not want to do this at all. At age 55, he is still young and most likely have a good income, saving or investment to depend on if he does proper wealth management. James is a happy man.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore happy family
3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore happy family

 

Case #2: Foreigner and decides to leave Singapore

In an unfortunate case where you have to leave Singapore, there are some strategies that you might want to consider for the SRS. I met Lucy a few years back. Lucy has been in Singapore for 3 years now but have not contributed to her SRS. She’s working in an MNC in Singapore and earns around $160,000. She fears that the economic downturn will affect her job opportunities in Singapore and asked to be returned to her country. This has been escalated due to COVID-19. Similarly, if she contributes $35,700 to her SRS, these are her numbers.

Without SRS: Lucy pays $13,950 of taxes that year.

With SRS: Lucy pays $8,595 of taxes that year. (Her chargeable income is $160,000 – $35,700)

In total, she saves $5,355 worth of taxes that year. She also saves $35,7000 in her SRS which she can use to invest for her retirement.

What if Lucy were to leave Singapore? Her fears are valid. It would mean that $35,700 would be stuck in her SRS. What if she leaves Singapore AND really needs the money? In this unfortunate situation, she will have to pay a 5% penalty and also be taxed on 100% of the withdrawal amount. This can be avoided if Lucy plans using the 6 Level Wealth Karate System.

Ideally, she can wait for 10 years from her first contribution to avoid the penalty and be taxed on 50% of the lump sum.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Sad Woman
3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore: I don’t want to go

 

Case #3: Local but wants to retire overseas

This has been a dream of many Singaporeans. Andrew has been working in Singapore all his life and contributes to his SRS account regularly. He has been telling his colleagues about his retirement which is happening in a few years time. He dreams that he will be able to retire in Thailand. He enjoys Thai food a lot and can’t wake to wake up on the beach of Phuket every day for the rest of his life.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Phuket
3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Phuket

We are in the midst of checking if SRS will be taxed differently due to the change of tax residency. We will update this article accordingly.

Update: SRS will be taxed according to tax residency and it depends on the following factors.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Tax Resident
3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Tax Resident

Final Thoughts

Please check in with your tax advisors for the above strategies. We also note that the rulings change from time to time so we want to be mindful about that.

Whether you are a local or a foreigner, it make sense to contribute to SRS (as discussed in the previous article). I will be talking about what to invest in using your SRS in the next article. Stay tune.

 

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.