SRS Last Chance Save 1 year with $1

SRS Last Chance: Save 1 year with $1

SRS Last Chance Save 1 year with $1
SRS Last Chance Save 1 year with $1

SRS is a voluntary scheme to help individuals save for retirement in additional to the Central Provident Fund (CPF) saving.

The SRS offers tax benefits and you can find a quick summary of SRS here. This information is crucial to you especially if you are above 40. I will be conducting a SRS webinar in the next few weeks. Join my Telegram Group where I share 1 financial tip a day where I will be posting more details.

Why is this a last chance?

SRS allows you to make penalty free withdrawals from your SRS on or after the statutory retirement age (currently at 62) that was prevailing at the time of your first SRS contribution. 

In the National Day Rally in 2019, it is already made know that the statutory retirement age will increase to 63 (in 2022) and 65 (by 2030).

This means that if you don’t make your first SRS contribution before 2022, your penalty free withdrawal year will increase by 1 year to age 63. This is your last chance in doing so.

SRS Last Chance Retirement Age Increase National Day Rally 2019
SRS Last Chance Retirement Age Increase National Day Rally 2019

How much do I need to contribute?

All it takes is $1. You didn’t hear me wrong. You don’t need to invest in anything yet. The account opening only require $1 (and around 1 minute). The purpose of it is to “lock in” your statutory retirement age to be 62. You can find out more in one of my most read article last year called the $1 SRS strategy.

You can then consider to invest it or think about investing using your SRS in future.

Final Thoughts

Personally, I think it is a no-brainer to open the account. The “opportunity cost” is just $1. That being said, the choice is still yours at the end of the day.

For those of you who have opened your accounts. What are you investing in currently?

Let me know in the comments below.

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game
Financial Lessons From The Squid Game

This show from Netflix needs no introduction. Amidst the games, the show highlighted the Korea Economy. One with highly-skewed income disparity, worsening household debt and survival of the fittest amid fierce competition.

South Korea is the 12th biggest economy in the world with a GDP of $1.6T. Singapore is trailing behind at 36th with a GDP of $364.2B. Though they are larger in GDP, it seems like the struggles they have with money is the same as Singapore or even worse.

While watching the show, I keep feeling that the characters behave very badly when it comes to money (or the lack of money). Just a few days after, I can’t help but think that it is an representation of what is happening in real life. (That’s probably why the show resonates to us on some level).

To avoid going down the slippery slope, I decided to consolidate the lessons we can learn from this so that we will NEVER have a situation like this EVER.

Hope you enjoy the read.

Spoiler Alerts: Please do not read this as it contains spoilers on the show. We invite you to come back after you finish the series.

 

We Have Emotions

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Emotion Greed Fear
Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Emotion Greed Fear (Source: Distractify)

I feel that this is something that isn’t acknowledged much in the financial world. It is often thought that most financial decision can be made logically easily. The basic assumption in most economic literature is that humans are rational in nature. However, behaviour economics proven time over time that this couldn’t be more wrong.

Starbucks Behaviour Economics Financial Lessons
Starbucks Behaviour Economics Financial Lessons (Source: S-Retech)

Consider this, you walk into Starbucks (or any other coffee places) to get your daily small dose of coffee. After looking at the prices, most people end up getting the big cup not because they wanted it but because it is a “much better price” than the medium. If you have also chosen the big cup, congratulations, you have experienced the Decoy Effect.

The Decoy Effects explains how an inclusion of an inferior 3rd choice (medium cup) will affect your consideration of between the initial 2 choices (large and small). When there is a decoy alternative, most people makes decision based less on what suits their needs and what we considered as a more beneficial alternative. This results in people spending more as a result at Starbucks.

This is just one of the many cognitive bias that we experience.

This is why it is not easy to invest in the long run, buying term and invest the rest is bad advice or why buy low and sell high is useless advice. I’m not denying that those are rational. It is logical. But we are humans. We experience fear, greed, anger, denial, lost, guilt, shame, hope, envy etc.

These makes it very tough to be rational in a body where we feel so much. Today, most people only focus on the rational side which makes it tough to have a good conversation on finances. I hope that more and more people can come to acknowledgement with their emotions in future.

You Can Win With The Right Strategy

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Right Strategy
Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Right Strategy

In this very epic game of tug of war, strength is very important. In the team of 10 people, the protagonist team have 3 ladies, 1 weak elderly and 6 men. They faces off a stronger team consisting of all men.

While it feels like the protagonists team have a clear disadvantage in this game, the weak elderly share his wisdom and experience on how to strategize and win against teams that are bigger and stronger than them.

The protagonists team barely escape death by execute the strategy and winning against a team far stronger than them.

In the financial world, you can consider the 10 people the resources that we have. Some of my peers have rich parents, some are left properties under their names, some have good networks and have parents financially independent. But, they may not be financially as well off.

I also have friends who have siblings who depend on them, a study loan, parents who believes that children is the ultimate retirement plan. In spite of this, some of them do succeed in their financial goals by having a right strategy and executing it well.

Having a strong 10 people/resource is important. It is as important as having the right strategy and executing it well.

Learn From Others Mistakes

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Learning From Mistakes
Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Learning From Mistakes

In another nerve wreaking game called the glass stepping game, participants are made to cross a glass bridge. Participants are presented 2 choices. Stepping on the right choice would mean safety, stepping on the wrong one would meant death. In any event the participant chooses the wrong one and dies, the one after him/her can choose the right one and proceed with the game.

In this game, it is awful being the first one.

In the financial world, money was first originated some where as early as 5000 B.C., in which tons of literature has already been written. One of the classics of financial books is The Richest Man in Babylon. Many important clues have been record and it is up to us to follow that roadmap presented to us.

Another way is to learn from the people around us. If our parents have achieve a certain level of financial freedom, we can learn from it. If our parents have not achieve any, we can also learn from that too.

In whichever case, there is always something to learn.

People Can Behave Badly When It Comes To Money

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Bad Behaviour
Financial Lessons From The Squid Game Bad Behaviour

In the final game of the series, Squid game, the 2 protagonists face off in a brutal, savage and barbaric fight. As their lives and the prize money was on the line, they really had a lot to fight for.

I was reminded of estate planning stories and divorce stories that were shared during my recent IBF Certification for Private Banking. Most of the stories were very unfortunate. In almost all cases, humans behaves very badly when it comes to money issues.

A old example happened in 2013 when a Singapore based couple committed “financial suicide”. Both have spend SGD$1.7 million on legal costs – just to decide where the divorce should be heard as well as litigation costs linked to the child. You can find the article from multimedia stations from NLB Libraries. It is written in The Straits Times dated Friday, 2 Aug 2013 by Senior Law Correspondent K.C. Vijayan.

Divorce Case Financial Suicide
Divorce Case Financial Suicide

In a more recent example, siblings are suing their elder brother over 2 properties worth SGD$3.1 million. As the estate planning was not poorly set up, it has resulted in a messy inheritance battle of which relationship will be ruined. Though it is not known what the legal costs are, I believe their relationship will never be the same again.

The Financial Journey

Financial Lessons From The Squid Game The Journey
Financial Lessons From The Squid Game The Journey

In the most iconic game called Green Light, Red Light, participants win by making their way towards the end of the line in a given time limit. They can only move when it is Green Light (when the doll is not facing them) and they have to stop any movement during Red Light (when the doll is facing them).

At the start, the participants don’t really understand what to do. 2 brave souls started the journey but ended up dead. This causes panic to everyone and people scrambled towards the “exit”. Unfortunately, they were all shot dead.

The cooler headed participants began their journey again. Unfortunately, some tripped either because they were moving too fast or just unlucky to bump into themselves. They died in their attempt to reach the end.

As some participants crossed the line and won the game, there were others that couldn’t cross the line and died as well.

In this game, it closely symbolizes our journey with money. In a given period of time (working years), we want to reach the end (retirement). Some people panic when they see others lost money in the investment and ran towards the exit (panic selling). Some people overleverage (move too fast), some people suffers from critical illness (bump into themselves), some people start too late (couldn’t reach the end). In all these cases, it resulted in people having a less than ideal lifestyle.

Final Thoughts

Overall, this show was a dark, ghastful and yet awfully realistic in showcasing the behaviour of humans put in those desperate situations.

I recommend watching a comedy after the show.

What other financial lessons have you learn from this show? Let me know in the comments below.

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.

5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF

5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF

Central Provident Fund (CPF) is a compulsory comprehensive savings and pension plan for working Singaporeans and permanent residents primarily to fund their retirement, healthcare, and housing needs in Singapore. It started in 1 July 1955 and just like our Integrated Shield Plans, there have been many changes over the years.

Like with most changes, some will appreciate it, others will not appreciate it as the “rules changed”.

Love it. Hate it. It is an asset class that we will have with us for the rest of our lives.

5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF
5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF

To help you understand CPF, the opportunities and optimization better, I have put together a free webinar to share my knowledge on it. Limited seats only. Join us with the link here.

 

Fun Fact #1: You cannot use your CPF to pay for your house in the past

Before 1968, CPF cannot be used to pay for a house. In 1968, the government finally allowed the use of CPF for the downpayment and to service the monthly mortgage loan instalment. Fast forward to 2021, majority of the people around me are using their CPF to pay for their downpayment and their monthly mortgage loan servicing.

This liberation allowed Singapore to have one of the highest house ownership levels in the world. However, as more money is used for housing, the original intend of CPF to help us retire may have taken a back seat. There is also the cause of concern for accrued interest.

Most of you might be servicing your mortgage with your CPF and worry that you do not have enough money in your CPF for retirement. For that purpose, I use a CPF Projection Calculator for my clients. This allow me to accurately measure the amount my clients will have in their CPF at age of 55. So far, they have found this insightful.

5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF Retirement Age 55
5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF Retirement Age 55

 

Fun Fact #2: Special Account (SA) was started in 1977

To help you with retirement, the special account was created in 1977. Tons of literature has been written on the special account. Among my favorites are the following. If done correctly, the following opportunities will help you in your retirement.

  1. Transferring Ordinary Account (OA) monies to Special Account (SA) to have a higher interest (up to 5%)
  2. Retirement Sum Top Up Scheme (RSTU): Top up up to $7000 into your CPF for tax deductible benefits.
  3. CPFIA: Using CPF-SA to invest (with limitations)

However, it is worth noting that the higher interest that the SA earns is not guaranteed. The floor rate of 4% has been extended by the government until 31 December 2021. The SA and Medisave (MA) rates are reviewed quarterly. The 1M65 movement takes the assumption of these rates being at 4%.

5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF Floor Rate
5 Things You Need To Know About Your CPF Floor Rate

 

Fun Fact #3: Medisave was started in 1984

Medical inflation isn’t new. Medisave was created to help you to pay for our healthcare cost. It is not hard to understand that one of the The Hidden Cost Of Retirement is Healthcare. With healthcare cost escalating at more than 10% per year, tons of measures have been implemented to help you pay for our healthcare cost.

Among which, you can use your medisave to pay for (part of) our integrated shield plans. There are some outpatient treatments that can be paid using medisave. You also have to set aside a Basic Healthcare Sum (BHS) in your CPF. The BHS is adjust annually to keep up with inflation. This is one initiative to help with medical cost.

BHS 2021
BHS 2021

With the new co-payment medical plans now, you will have to plan for your retirement a little differently.

 

Fun Fact #4: Minimum Sum Scheme Was The First Version of CPF-Life

CPF is still about retirement. Before CPF-Life, there was the minimum sum scheme (MSS). However, as your life expectancy increase, you run a risk of outliving your MSS. Hence, the retirement scheme was updated/upgraded to become the CPF-Life. The retirement account (RA) is created at age 55. Your OA and SA monies will be transferred into the RA during then.

CPF Life Full Retirement Sum 2020
CPF Life Full Retirement Sum 2020

Assuming that you have $181,000 (FRS) in your Retirement Account (RA), you will get between $1390 to $1490 per month for the rest of your life starting from age 65. This will form part of your retirement cashflow. There are 9 options for you to choose from at age 55.

 

Fun Fact #5: There is a maximum amount of money you can put into CPF a year

You can’t just simply top up everything into your CPF. There is a maximum of $37,740 of mandatory and voluntary contributions that a person (employee or self-employed person) can make in a calendar year is subject to the CPF Annual Limit.

 

Final Thoughts By Wealthdojo

I personally like the CPF scheme because it really helps a lot of people including myself plan for our retirement seriously. I contribute to my SA every single year so that I can make use of the tax incentive and also hit my FRS in the years to come. Having enough in my medisave gives me the confidence to pay my integrated shield plans yearly and usually the interest on my medisave pays for my shield plan.

To each his own. Love it. Hate it. It is an asset class that we will have with us for the rest of our lives.

If you would like to benefit from CPF more, I have put together a free webinar to share my knowledge on it. Limited seats only. Join us with the link here.

 

Join my Telegram Channel for a tip a day! In Wealthdojo, we dedicate a small amount of time daily for learning new things. Continuous learning is one of the greatest secrets of success.

For those of you who want to turbocharge your journey, contact me at chengkokoh@gmail.com. I would like to hear from you what your experiences are currently and from there, we develop a plan specially catered just for your journey.

We wish you all the best! Stay Safe and Take Care!

Chengkok, Sensei of Wealthdojo.

CapitaLand Restructuring Is it good or bad

CapitaLand Restructuring: Is it good or bad?

CapitaLand Restructuring Is it good or bad
CapitaLand Restructuring Is it good or bad

CapitaLand shares was halted on Monday morning (22nd March 2021). Along with it, Ascott Residence Trust, Capitaland Integrated Commercial Trust, Ascendas Reit, CapitaLand China Trust and Ascendas India Trust, was also halted pending a released of an announcement.

On the same day, we got an answer. CapitaLand Limited (SGX: C31)is going to be restructured. In this article, we are going to figure out what is happening and also what is the good or bad about this restructuring. Should it be part of our wealth management journey or in our SRS portfolio?

Disclaimer: This is not a buy/sell recommendation. I do not hold any SGX:C31 shares.

 

Brief Information About CapitaLand Limited

CapitaLand owns 1090 properties in 242 cities spanning over 35 countries (as of 23 March 2021). It is the 3rd largest listed global REIM and Asia’s largest REIM.

They own a stable collection of REITs and business trusts comprising of CapitaLand Integrated Commercial Trust, Ascendas Real Estate Investment Trust, Ascott Residence Trust, CapitaLand China Trust, Ascendas India Trust and CapitaLand Malaysia Mall Trust.

CapitaLand Restructuring Top Real Estate Investment Managers
CapitaLand Restructuring Top Real Estate Investment Managers

That being said, the share price trend has been extremely disappointing over the long horizon. Most investors probably bought into CapitaLand for it’s dividend yields.

CapitaLand Restructuring Share Prices History
CapitaLand Restructuring Share Prices History

 

Summary of Restructuring: The Development Arm is going to be Privatized

CapitaLand Restructuring Development Arm Privatized
CapitaLand Restructuring Development Arm Privatized

Shareholders will now see the development part of the business privatized. They will be “compensated” with a combination of $0.951 cash, 1x CLIM (CapitaLand Investment Management) shares and also 0.155x CICT (CapitaLand Integrated Commercial Trust) shares. It does sounds like a very good deal.

(The assumption here is that CLIM trades at a fair value of 1x NAV. I’m trying to find data to share how CapitaLand has traded on NAV over the years. Do let me know if you can find the source for this.)

CapitaLand Restructuring Proposed Offer
CapitaLand Restructuring Proposed Offer

According to the Chairman of CLA Real Estate Holding response in the news release, the privatization will provide flexibility for the development business to pursue longer gestation and capital-intensive projects.

This is where I felt a bit uncomfortable with the restructuring which I will explain below.

 

The Good Part About The Restructuring

Firstly, I believe that the restructuring is excellent if you think about the conglomerate discount that CapitaLand may be facing. Conglomerates often trade at a discount versus companies that are more focused on their core products and services.

Mr Lee Chee Koon, Group CEO of CapitaLand Group says the same thing but in another way. As listed REIMs generally trade at a premium to their NAVs in the capital markets, we are confident that CLIM will be able to drive returns for our shareholders given its scale, capabilities and a strong ecosystem.” (Developers are usually traded at a discount).

Secondly, for those that feel that the development part of the business is hard to analyze or “risky”, this new structure becomes a “cleaner” and easier to analyze. There is more certainty in CLIM and probably that’s what local investors want. They will be paid a mixture of cash and CICT stocks for the development part of the business.

 

The Not So Good Part About The Restructuring

The growth driver of the company (CLIM) is now gone and the price CLA is paying is cheap (in my own opinion). I personally feel that the $1.279 (cash + CICT shares) are a cheap price to pay for the development arm of CapitaLand. Effectively, if CapitaLand were to grow in future, they have to then acquire new development property from (guess who) the CLA. I have no figures to back any statement down below so treat the following opinion with caution.

At this moment, the price for the development arm is not priced in or in fact, unknown to a retail investor.

I’m certain in the distant future that CLA will sell and offload some of the properties that they are developing now back to CapitaLand. According to FY2020 CapitaLand results, the development arm is pivoting towards ‘new economy’ asset classes. S$3.4 billion of new investments were made in business park, logistics etc. There are mentions of investing in Japan’s logistics sector (completing in 4Q 2022), Korea Data Centre Fund 1 (invest in an offmarket data centre development project near Seoul in South Korea), Two Class A tech office properties in San Francisco, etc. I believe these are interesting developments which may be sold back to CapitaLand in future.

Since the development arm is privatised, we will no longer have a visuals or information on properties/land that are developed. It might be difficult to see if the cost are justifiable or not.

There is also no more vested interest for CLA to give CLIM a good price for those properties. This means that properties that are acquired by CLIM moving forward may be more richly valued and CLIM may need to fund these properties using issuing of new shares.

 

Final Thoughts By Wealthdojo

On a business point of view, I personally feel that CLIM may not be as attractive as before.

On a share price point of view, I believe if people value CLIM differently moving forward, we may see the share price performing better.

If you do have any other views, whether it is similar or contrasting, I would love to hear from you in the comments below.

Invest safe.

 

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.

My SRS Portfolio March 2021

My SRS Portfolio and Thoughts [March 2021]

My SRS Portfolio March 2021
My SRS Portfolio March 2021

After a series of SRS related articles in 2020, there are some readers from investingnote and my telegram channel that asked me to be transparent with my SRS investments. After some discussion with some of my readers, I will be doing regular updates on my thought process of investing using my SRS and the reasons why I invest in some of these funds or products.

The Standard Disclaimer: This is not and should not be taken as a buy/sell recommendation.

Before looking into using SRS to invest, these are some links you should read first before continuing.

Start Here: The $1 SRS Strategy

Basic Knowledge: 5 things you need to know about SRS when you are 40 and older

Your SRS Overseas Retirement Guide: 3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore

For 40s and above: 10 SRS Investments to Consider Especially if you are 40 and older

Income Tax and SRS: How Much Is My Income Taxes [2021 Edition]

 

SRS Objective

To invest in sectors that are growing and balance it with reits exposure.

 

My Considerations

There are 3 instruments that I personally think is interesting and of investing value at this moment of time.

Lion-OCBC Securities Hang Seng TECH ETF (HST.SI)

This ETF is investing into the 30 largest TECH-themed companies listed in Hong Kong. It is diversified across 30 companies ranging from Alibaba to ZTO. While it is undeniable that there may be regulatory risk associated with this ETF, I believe that companies such as Tencent, Alibaba, JD, SMIC is going to propel China’s economy into the future. I’m not going in depth into the reason of investing in this article. Currently, I’m already vested into this ETF.

LGI HST ETF
LGI HST ETF

 

Manulife US Reits (SGX:BTOU)

Manulife US Reits is one that I have been eyeing for a look time. The reits is exposed to income-producing office real estate in key markets in the United States. I personally like the WALE by NLA and also occupancy rates of this reits.

Manulife US Reits Portfolio
Manulife US Reits Portfolio

Let me address one common question about COVID-19 affecting office real estates in USA. USA has been adopting working from home for a long time. Beyond the financials, it is important for the company to have a good working culture. The synergy fortunately is created from social interactions in office.

From the corporate presentation in March 2021, only 5% of companies mentioned that there will no longer be a need for an office. Around 70% of bosses expected employees to working from office at least 3 days a week. Similarly, around 70% of bosses expect that they would need more space due to rising headcount and also social distancing needs. Manulife reits rents to a well diversified tenant base ranging from Legal (21% of gross rental income), Finance and Insurance (18.1% of gross rental income), retail trade (13.8% of gross rental income) and so on. Personally, I’m comfortable with this even with the new norms that we might be experiencing. Currently, I’m vested into this reit.

Manulife US Reits Portfolio Work From Home
Manulife US Reits Portfolio Work From Home

 

Exposure to Institutional Investors (Ballie Gifford, Blackrock, Wellington)

Currently, I’m not invested into this yet because my SRS funds are insufficient to purchase into them yet. As I’m a representative from AIA Singapore, I would not be able to write the product. Feel free to reach out to me for more details regarding this.

The reason why I think it would make an great investment thesis is because of the expertise of the 3 companies. Wellington is famous for their exposure in the value investing companies. Ballie Gifford is well known for investing in growth companies (such as Tesla). Blackrock is famous for their fixed income. Depending on your intended risk profile, the 3 funds will be allocated accordingly.

I am planning to contribute to SRS in 2021 again for tax purposes. That will be the moment of time where I will be investing into this instrument.

 

Final Thoughts By Wealthdojo

I reckon my positions will not be changing much. The next change will probably be after the addition of new funds into my SRS to purchase the plan that give me exposure to the institutional investors. Wishing everyone the best in their investment journey.

Do reach out to me if you wish to explore your SRS options.

My SRS Portfolio
My SRS Portfolio

 

Chengkok is a licensed Financial Services Consultant since 2012. He is an Investment and Critical Illness Specialist. Wealthdojo was created in 2019 to educate and debunk “free financial advice” that was given without context.  

Feel Free To Reach Out To Share Your Thoughts.

Contact: 94316449 (Whatsapp) chengkokoh@gmail.com (Email)
Telegram: Wealthdojo [Continuous Learning Channel]
Reviews: About Me

The views and opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organisation, employer or company. Assumptions made in the analysis are not reflective of the position of any entity other than the author.