Confession I used to believe that millionaires were always right about money

Confession: I used to believe that millionaires were always right about money.

Confession I used to believe that millionaires were always right about money

Confession: I used to believe that millionaires were always right about money

I still remember the first Wealth Management Seminar that I went. I woke up early that morning to take a 1.5 hours bus ride to expo. It was going to be 3 days where millionaires were invited on the big stage to share how they become rich. There were various strategies. Properties, Tax Lien, Value Investing, Options Trading, E-commerce, SRS hacks, you just have to name it.

I have to admit. I was impressed by the seminar. I thought I was in the presence of legends. I was introduced to a few “self-made millionaires” and I thought that I was really blessed to be able to hear their sharing. I took notes of every single word they say, every single habit they have and every single tip they gave.

I was all fired up.

Today, I’m a little wiser and can tell you with 100% conviction that just because they are a millionaire (or appear to be), it does not mean they are right about money.

 

Confession #1: I look up to them without knowing their source of wealth

I know of a guy who was in his 20s (I will not be sharing his name to protect the identify of the speaker). On stage, he was explaining his methodology on how he became rich. He shared that to be successful you have to be humble, live within your means, invest and compound. He went from a $1000 portfolio to managing a 7 digits portfolio in 3 years and he was still in his 20s! That’s incredible.

After being acquainted with this person, I realised that he wasn’t really following any budget and was spending lavishly. I questioned his habits only be dismissed by saying he can make it back easily by selling his course.

I was really disturbed after I heard that. I acknowledge his ability to make money but lost respect for he did not practice what he preached.

I believe many young people (like myself) look up to these “rich” people hoping to be one of them. At the end of the day, you do need capital to invest. It is easier to grow toward 7 digits portfolio when you already have a property that you want sell or an high income skillset.

Don’t look up to “successful” people blindly without truly understanding where their source of wealth is from. It could be range from inheritance to insurance proceeds and not what you thought it is.

 

Confession #2: I get intimated by fanciful titles

Just because someone is financially educated or more experienced than you, doesn’t mean that they’re always right. “Fund manager”, “Assets Enhancing Specialist”, “Chief Investment Officer” etc are fanciful titles that you probably see on the newspaper. It could come in other forms like “Value Investing Guru”, “The Options Specialist” or “Asia Real Estate Guru”.

Those titles are impressive. My friend was “promoted” to be a senior manager in her company because her customers only want to work with someone from the management. Her pay scale was the same, her job scope was the same but the company had to inflate her title so that she will get a response from her customers. It sounds weird but titles do make an impression in our lives.

Another friend of mine is a Chief Financial Officer of a company. He was earning around $15,000 monthly (Our most popular article: Is $30,000 salary a month enough?) and I thought he probably had a good financial plan. It turns out that he have less than $1,000 in his bank account, owes 5 digit credit card bills and no asset under his name.

Morale of the story: Don’t be intimated by fanciful titles. (Not even wealth sensei)

Ridiculous job titles

Ridiculous job titles

 

Confession #3: I was impressed by jargons

When I first started investing, there were many times I felt being out-jargon in a seminar. The more jargons they said, the more I felt I needed to learn. I love it when the trainers pop out words like “50 days exponential moving average”, “cashflow conversion cycle” or the “gamma of the option” out of the blue. I was impressed on their wealth of knowledge and want to learn from them.

While they have the wealth of knowledge, I realised that some of them never invest before in the stock market. They were using “difficult terms” but when I asked about the practicality and the application, they don’t seemed to have the answer or able share any experience. I was really surprised.

Don’t be impressed by jargons.

 

Final Thoughts

Whether it is the love of jargons or fanciful titles, find someone who embodies the meaning of wealth to you. Follow them, learn from them, become wealthy yourself too.

True Wealth

True Wealth

PS: Wealthdojo was selected by Feedspot as one of the Top 75 Singapore Investment Blogs on the web. I would like thank our readers (yes you) for your support in reading and sharing our articles. We will strive to be better and better in the years ahead!

Top 75 Singapore Investment Blog

Top 75 Singapore Investment Blog

Join my Telegram Channel for a tip a day! In Wealthdojo, we dedicate a small amount of time daily for learning new things. Continuous learning is one of the greatest secrets of success.

For those of you who want to turbocharge your journey, contact me at chengkokoh@gmail.com. I would like to hear from you what your experiences are currently and from there, we develop a plan specially catered just for your journey.

We wish you all the best! Stay Safe and Take Care!

Chengkok, Sensei of Wealthdojo.

 

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore

It is the Supplementary Retirement Scheme (SRS) contribution season. If you are 40 and above, do check out my previous post on the 5 things you need to know about SRS. Interestingly, someone emailed me on my 6 Level Wealth Karate System Page to ask about what will happen to their SRS account if they leave Singapore.

In this article, we will talk about 3 potential scenarios (i) if you are a foreigner and continue to stay in Singapore (you should!) (ii) if you are a foreigner but decide to leave Singapore (iii) if you are local and intend to retire in overseas (Thailand, Phuket, you name it).

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore: Don’t leave =(

I’m a Singaporean and proud to be one. Singapore is a wonderful country. You should not leave =). Unfortunately, I do meet people who love Singapore but have no choice but to leave because they were asked to relocate to another country. Anyway, let’s set the context for the SRS. Most people will probably be concerned if it is worth it to contribute to their SRS when long term stay in Singapore is not confirm. We will touching on that.

I would also need to point out the withdrawal tax concession and the 5% early withdrawal penalty.

 

SRS Early Withdrawal Penalty (Local and Foreigner)

Withdrawal after retirement age (current age 62): You can start making penalty-free withdrawal from your SRS account. You will only be taxed 50% of the amount you withdraw for the calendar year.

Withdrawal before retirement age (current age 62): Although you can make withdrawal from your SRS account at any time that you want, you will be subjected to a penalty of 5% of the amount withdrawn. In addition, the full amount withdrawn will also be subject to income tax.

There are other special circumstances which we will not be going into detail (Death/Medical Grounds/Bankrupt)

 

SRS Additional Withdrawal Criteria (Foreigner)

As a foreigner, you can withdraw your SRS monies without the 5% penalty if you meet the following criteria:

(i) a foreigner for a continuous period of at least 10 years preceding the date of withdrawal.
(ii) one lump sum after maintaining your SRS account for at least 10 years from the date of your first contribution.

For such withdrawal, you will be taxed 50% of the withdrawal amount.

After understanding the above criteria, let’s consider a the few scenario that might happen to you.

 

Case #1: Foreigner and continue to stay in Singapore

James is a foreigner who is staying in Singapore for many years. When I first met James, he told me that he really love Singapore. He likes the sunny weather, he likes the hawker food (his favourite is chicken rice) and also a father of 2 beautiful young children.

He has an intention to stay in Singapore to raise his family.

James contributes to his SRS account every year. This is because as a foreigner, he does not have CPF contribution. By contributing to the SRS, he is able to reduce his taxable income, save on taxes and also save for retirement.

James is 45 this year and he is plan to contribute the full $35,700 into his SRS every year. He makes around $160,000 a year. Assuming no other personal tax deduction.

Without SRS: James pays $13,950 of taxes that year.

With SRS: James pays $8,595 of taxes that year. (His chargeable income is $160,000 – $35,700)

In total, he saves $5,355 worth of taxes that year. He also saves $35,7000 in his SRS which he can use to invest for his retirement.

In 10 years time, he save a total of $53,550 worth of taxes. At the same time, he would have accumulated nearly $481,462 if he decides to invest his monies in his SRS assuming it grows at 4%. He can decide if he wants to withdraw the lump sum.

If he does so, he have to pay 50% taxes on withdrawal amount. Let’s assume he does not have any income that year. He will be taxed on $241,000 (50% of $481,462). He pays a tax of $28,945. He saves about $24,605 ($53,550-$28,945) if he contributes to SRS. In this case, he benefits from this.

However, James may not want to do this at all. At age 55, he is still young and most likely have a good income, saving or investment to depend on if he does proper wealth management. James is a happy man.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore happy family

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore happy family

 

Case #2: Foreigner and decides to leave Singapore

In an unfortunate case where you have to leave Singapore, there are some strategies that you might want to consider for the SRS. I met Lucy a few years back. Lucy has been in Singapore for 3 years now but have not contributed to her SRS. She’s working in an MNC in Singapore and earns around $160,000. She fears that the economic downturn will affect her job opportunities in Singapore and asked to be returned to her country. This has been escalated due to COVID-19. Similarly, if she contributes $35,700 to her SRS, these are her numbers.

Without SRS: Lucy pays $13,950 of taxes that year.

With SRS: Lucy pays $8,595 of taxes that year. (Her chargeable income is $160,000 – $35,700)

In total, she saves $5,355 worth of taxes that year. She also saves $35,7000 in her SRS which she can use to invest for her retirement.

What if Lucy were to leave Singapore? Her fears are valid. It would mean that $35,700 would be stuck in her SRS. What if she leaves Singapore AND really needs the money? In this unfortunate situation, she will have to pay a 5% penalty and also be taxed on 100% of the withdrawal amount. This can be avoided if Lucy plans using the 6 Level Wealth Karate System.

Ideally, she can wait for 10 years from her first contribution to avoid the penalty and be taxed on 50% of the lump sum.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Sad Woman

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore: I don’t want to go

 

Case #3: Local but wants to retire overseas

This has been a dream of many Singaporeans. Andrew has been working in Singapore all his life and contributes to his SRS account regularly. He has been telling his colleagues about his retirement which is happening in a few years time. He dreams that he will be able to retire in Thailand. He enjoys Thai food a lot and can’t wake to wake up on the beach of Phuket every day for the rest of his life.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Phuket

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Phuket

We are in the midst of checking if SRS will be taxed differently due to the change of tax residency. We will update this article accordingly.

Update: SRS will be taxed according to tax residency and it depends on the following factors.

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Tax Resident

3 things you need to know about SRS if you plan to leave Singapore Tax Resident

Final Thoughts

Please check in with your tax advisors for the above strategies. We also note that the rulings change from time to time so we want to be mindful about that.

Whether you are a local or a foreigner, it make sense to contribute to SRS (as discussed in the previous article). I will be talking about what to invest in using your SRS in the next article. Stay tune.

 

Join my Telegram Channel for a tip a day! In Wealthdojo, we dedicate a small amount of time daily for learning new things. Continuous learning is one of the greatest secrets of success.

For those of you who want to turbocharge your journey, contact me at chengkokoh@gmail.com. I would like to hear from you what your experiences are currently and from there, we develop a plan specially catered just for your journey.

We wish you all the best! Stay Safe and Take Care!

Chengkok, Sensei of Wealthdojo.

Is Tesla in trouble Why is Tesla raising $5 billion now Impact

Tesla just raised $5 billion from stock offering. Are they really in need of cash?

On 1 Sept 2020, Tesla (TSLA) announced a $5 billion capital raise through equity distribution agreement. I thought it was a brilliant move as written in my previous article. (Is Tesla in trouble? Why is Tesla raising $5 billion now?). Just when the world just began to understand the news, they completed the deal on the 4th Sept 2020. Do they really need the money that urgently?

Tesla just raised $5 billion from stock offering Are they really in need of cash.

Tesla just raised $5 billion from stock offering. Are they really in need of cash?

 

I never expect to write this article that quickly. In any case, this presents my thoughts on why TSLA is doing this so quickly.

 

Non-inclusion into the S&P 500 Index

Previously, I speculated that the equity raise was to give more liquidity to prepare for the inclusion in the S&P 500 Index. However, that idea was snubbed out when TSLA were passed over for inclusion. Instead, Etsy, Catalent and Teradyne was included into the Index as part of the portfolio re-balancing.

The reason remains unknown. Personally, I feel that whoever is making this decision wants to make the S&P 500 Index less speculative in nature. TSLA has a relatively higher short ratio as compared to the other companies. An inclusion of TSLA might make the S&P 500 “correct” more often. (Donald Trump won’t want that to happen).

TSLA Short Ratio

TSLA Short Ratio

 

Buy Low. Sell High.

In any case, TSLA isn’t doing any buying. They are merely issuing out new shares. The best way to get more bang for its’ buck is to sell it at a higher price. We all know that TSLA YTD is around 325%. This is perhaps the best to time to “sell high” for whatever purpose they want to use the money for.

With regards to dilution, it is roughly around 1% dilution.

You can view their SEC Filing Form 8-K here.

 

Final Thoughts

This is not a buy/sell recommendation. Personally, I still think that Elon Musk is an expert in raising capital. I like his vision but have trouble understanding the valuation of TSLA. I have no positions in TSLA nor do I intend to start a position soon.

 

Join my Telegram Channel for a tip a day! In Wealthdojo, we dedicate a small amount of time daily for learning new things. Continuous learning is one of the greatest secrets of success.

For those of you who want to turbocharge your journey, contact me at chengkokoh@gmail.com. I would like to hear from you what your experiences are currently and from there, we develop a plan specially catered just for your journey.

We wish you all the best! Stay Safe and Take Care!

Chengkok, Sensei of Wealthdojo.

The hidden cost of retirement

The Hidden Cost Of Retirement: Healthcare

Many of us look forward to retirement. It is the time when we can finally enjoy our lives and the fruits of our labor. We envision that we can use the hard-earned money that we have save and invest in our wealth management journey to spend on the finer things in life.

The hidden cost of retirement

The hidden cost of retirement: I wonder why are retirement photos all at the beach.

However, as we grow older, there is this cost that keeps creeping up. If uncareful, may derail our retirement.

(This is a joint-post together with Life Finance. Do check them out. I think the quality of their article are great. They are certainly one of the better writers out there and I’m happy that there is someone like them writing on these important topics)

 

Healthcare costs in retirement

Healthcare costs will form a significant part of retirement spending. In Life Finance previous article, he documented that healthcare costs will shoot up from a bit less than 7% of household spending for a typical household before retirement to more than 12% after retirement. This is on top of health insurance spending. This 12% of overall spending is made up of the deductibles, co-payments and other outpatient expenses tat actually comes out of the retirees’ pockets (or Medisave account).

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare cost

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare cost

The higher percentage does not mean that a retired household spends less on everything else. In fact, once household size and inflation are accounted for, retired households actually spend the same amount after retirement as they do before. Hence planning for higher healthcare costs is crucial as part of retirement planning.

 

Why does healthcare costs go up in retirement?

It is no secret that while inflation has moderated for most goods and services in the past few years with slowing economic growth, healthcare inflation has continued unabated. But the rate at it is going up is not well known. Let’s look at some data.

From the data.gov website, we can see that healthcare inflation has outpaced general inflation, in the last few years.

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare inflation

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare: Inflation

But this chart gives a relatively benign view of healthcare cost inflation, showing that it is still manageable. This is however, not true at the patient level, especially for retirees. As life expectancy increases, Singaporeans are also seeing an increase in the number of years spent in ill health to more than 10 years out of a lifespan of 84 years. This means that the corresponding bills for healthcare will increase, as hospital stays becomes longer, and procedures become more complex.

To get a better sense of the increase in healthcare costs at the patient level, we can look at the Ministry of Health’s Fee Benchmarks Committee Report from 2018. While Class A public hospital bills grew by 4.9% per year between 2007 and 2017, private hospital bills grew by 9% a year in that same period!

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare bills

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare bills

Beyond that, healthcare costs have kept increasing. Mercer in 2019 indicated that in 2018, Singapore healthcare cost inflation was 10% and the same is projected for 2019 and 2020

In addition to hospital bills and healthcare costs going up, retirees are faced with the fact that the frequency of their hospital stays will also increase. The likelihood of hospitalization in any year will go up from between 20% – 27% for retirees in their late 60’s and early 70’s, to a staggering 70% – 80% when they reach their mid 80’s, or a three-fold increase at a minimum.

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare hospitalisation episodes

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare hospitalisation episodes

A three-fold increase over 20 years corresponds to a growth rate of hospitalization of 7% per year.

Hence, to get the true rate of healthcare cost increase in the retirement years, we need to consider both:
a) The higher frequency of hospitalization and healthcare needs
b) The growing rate of healthcare inflation

Putting both these figures together:

• Retiree patients in Class A wards in public hospitals will be faced with a 12% increase in healthcare costs per year (4.9% and 7%)
• Retiree patients using Private hospitals will be faced with a 18% rise in healthcare costs on a year-on-year basis

While it is true that with healthcare insurance, such as Medishield Life or an Integrated Shield plan, much of these rising costs can be transferred to the insurer, the retiree patient is still faced with the prospect of rising co-payments and other out of pocket costs. Furthermore, rising healthcare costs will ultimately be reflected in higher insurance premiums as well, which is what we discuss next.

 

Rising healthcare insurance premiums

As healthcare cost increase as explained above, premiums from medical insurance will go up due to the risk pooling nature of insurance policies. From 2015 to 2020, Singapore’s medical insurance premium began its steep incline. The Ministry of Health has stepped in on many initiatives such as co-payment, the use of preferred doctors and also pre-authorisation to help cope the medical inflation rates in Singapore.

The Medishield Life Committee gave their recommendation in 2014 with the proposal of the upgrade from Medishield to Medishield Life. In a nutshell, it means that the scope of coverage will increase and at the same time, the premiums will increase. There were a series of government subsidies over the last 5 years to help Singaporeans cope with the rising cost of medical insurance.

As the Integrated Shield (IP) plan is made up of Medishield (Now Life) and Additional Insurance Coverage from Insurance company, this directly increase the overall premiums that consumers have to pay.

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare medishield life

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare Medishield life

To the same time, insurance companies were making underwriting loses as net claims faced by the insurers outpaced premiums earned, particularly for plans covering private hospitals. Net claims are made up of the absolute cost of healthcare and the frequency of healthcare. The absolute cost of healthcare has gone up over the years as written above. At the same time, with medical advancement, it is more common for people now to seek medical treatment as compared to the past. These has made premiums unsustainable in the long run.

Between the years 2016 and 2019, the premiums of riders and the private insurance component of IP increase on average of 24% and 10% respectively each year. These trends are largely reflective of increases in private hospital insurance claims.

The raise in questionable claims also push up the claims experience of the insurance companies. (Quoted from source almost fully to retain the meaning of the article)

In one example, A 37-year-old woman stayed seven days in hospital for abdominal hernia repair. Of the $46,000 bill, the surgeon’s share was $31,900, or five times the norm. It transpired that while in hospital, she also had her breast augmented, and a tummy tuck with the fat transferred to her buttocks, but since these are not covered by insurance, none of this was stated in the bill.

A second example is for a woman was warded for 42 days for cervical sprain and strain (or pain in the neck) but received treatment only on seven days. She was given physiotherapy and painkillers for the other 35 days, something that could have been done as outpatient treatment. The bill was $84,000.

The combination of Medishield Life premiums increase, healthcare cost inflation, frequency of healthcare and the raise of questionable claims made the previous premiums charged unsustainable. This led to an inevitable increase in medical insurance inflation and also tightening of the claim procedures in the last 5 years.

 

Cost of Hidden Cost of Retirement

Medical insurance is one cost that people don’t usually take into account during retirement. We generally assume we will be well (why will we not) and plan for our living expenses with occasional holiday or two. However, we have to bring this to you to share with you the cost of medical insurance at your age of retirement.

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare great eastern shield

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare great eastern shield

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare great eastern totalcare

The hidden cost of retirement healthcare great eastern totalcare

Taking Great Eastern medical policy as an example (Disclaimer: We are not advocating any insurance policies from any company. We are using Great Eastern as an example for premium calculation. In my experience, the premiums for the other companies should be around the same).

At age of 65, we will need to annual cash premium of $2,226 ($967+$1259) for a private hospital coverage (with 5% co-payment). This comes out to be around $185/month.

In 5 years time, at the age of 70, we will need to pay an annual cash premium of $3,234 ($1695+$1539) which comes out to be around $269/month.

If this don’t scare you, at age of 75, we will need to pay an annual cash premium of $4,685 ($2650+$2035) which comes out to be around $390/month.

In Singapore, our life expantacy is around 85, I cannot imagine how one can afford those premiums when that time happens. All this is assuming that there is no future medical inflation which does not inflate the current premiums now.

PS: If you thinking that you can self-insure and not have any insurance, I hope that I have to burst your bubble.

 

Final Thoughts

The hard truth is that healthcare cost is going to continue to increase due to the factors explained above. The first thing I get my client to plan for is their paycheck. Remember that during retirement, there is a paycheck and a playcheck. The paycheck consist of items such as healthcare cost, phone bills, utilities, basic food and beverages and so on. Usually, we allocate money from “safer” asset class  to take care of those cost because it will have to be paid at whichever market conditions.

The playcheck is the one we are more familiar with. It consist of items such as exotic holidays, a roadtrip, etc.

Whichever the paycheck or playcheck, it is part of our retirement journey.

Thank you Life Finance for your contributions. If you like this article, do comment before and leave a message for me or Life Finance.

 

No one will care about your money as much as you do.

In Wealth Management, it is important to Pay yourself first. Beware of scams. Before you invest in any company or popular investment opportunity, be sure to do your own due diligence. If you wish to learn more about investment, I hope to nurture genuine relationships with all of my readers.

Check out my most popular blog post in 2020 so far: 5 mistakes people make using their CPF.

Please feel free to contact me on my Instagram (@chengkokoh) or Facebook Page or my Telegram Channel! Or subscribe to our newsletter now!

$30000 per month crazy rich asians

Is $30,000 Salary a Month Enough?

QNS: Is $30,000 Salary a month enough?

When I ask this question to my clients, the first response I get is: HOW I FIND SUCH A JOB??

Last Sunday, Straits Times published an article titled $30,000 salaries, yet in serious debt (it is an premium article). This started almost an outrage in the Wealth Management and Personal Finance community in Singapore. Most of the comments were related to where to find such a job and probably missed the point of personal finance. Let’s explore the reasons when $30,000 salary a month is not enough?

$30000 per month crazy rich asians

$30000 per month: Crazy Rich Asians: May not with $30,000

Reason #1: You spend more than $30,000 a month

Typically, as we grow in affluence, our purchasing power increase and we tend to spend more to.

Meet John. John is a hardworking young professional. His first salary was $3000/month and he had to live a simple lifestyle. Along the years, John got promoted for his outstanding working performance and ability to show results. His salary gradually increase to $15,000/month. John is now working harder at work and often end work late. He will take a cab home (he used to take the public transport) and order a good meal from a nearby restaurant (he used to cook) to reward himself for the hard work. When he sees something that likes during shopping, he will buy it immediately (he used to ponder if the item is essential)  because he feels that he can afford it and he don’t have much time to shop anyway. He buys his friends meals (he used to go dutch) because he feels he is doing well.

John wakes up one day and was shocked to find out that his bank account balance haven’t been increasing after his promotion and has decreased.

If you spend more than you earn, then you will be in deficit.

 

$30000 per month salary spending more than you make

$30000 per month salary: spending more than you make

 

Reason #2: You acquire more debts that you can handle.

Previously, I wrote about a Quick Ratio that we can use to evaluate whether the company is financially healthy.

“A company CANNOT go bankrupt if it doesn’t have debts” ~Chengkok

I can’t remember who said this before so I’m just going to quote myself until someone prove me wrong. (Haha). During the COVID19 season, we are seeing record number of companies going bankrupt and closing down. Examples are like JC Penny, Hertz and AMC just to name a few. If you look at their financial records, it would be just a matter of them that they will go under.

Similarly, for personal finance, if you take on too much debts than you can handle, your cashflow will be severely impacted.

 

Reason #2.1: Leverage

Reason 2.1 is a compounder for reason 2.

When I was 19 years old, I was scared stiff of the stock market. That was because I had a friend who lost over USD$50,000 in one night in his CFD trade. $50,000 is a huge sum to a 19 year old kid and it scared me silly.

Leverage works like this. You ONLY require a SMALL sum to get a BIGGER exposure. Most people who have limited capital are attracted to this because of the high returns. However, if the stock price goes south, you have to pay for the exposure too. A capital of $10,000 can easily give you an exposure of $200,000. However, if the stock price plunge, you could lose a significant portion of the $200,000 that you DO NOT EVEN HAVE and hence acquire the debts that you don’t want.

“Go big or go home. Typically in investing, people go home” ~Chengkok

$30000 per month salary leverage

$30000 per month salary: Leverage

 

Reason #3: Bad Habits

In The Straits Times article, bad habits or poor financial planning will cause your financial downfall no matter how much you earn. Data from the Monetary Authority of Singapore shows that

  • 34 home owners have asked to stop payment for their loan until December
  • 2100 people have problem paying education and renovation loans
  • 6200 have asked to convert high credit card debt into term loan on lower interest rates

The list goes on. Gambling is also one habit that might cause financial woes. We are often reminded by the National Council on Problem Gambling on not to gamble especially during the Chinese New Year.

 

Conclusion

Some questions that we can ask ourselves in our financial journey.

Income plays just one part in your Wealth Management journey. It is your habits, your mindset and the people that you hang around with that helps you reach the level of financial freedom you want.

 

No one will care about your money as much as you do.

In Wealth Management, it is important to Pay yourself first. Beware of scams. Before you invest in any company or popular investment opportunity, be sure to do your own due diligence. If you wish to learn more about investment, I hope to nurture genuine relationships with all of my readers.

Check out my most popular blog post in 2020 so far: 5 mistakes people make using their CPF.

Please feel free to contact me on my Facebook Page or  Telegram Channel! Or subscribe to our newsletter now!